Growth Opportunities: Job-Seeking Advice for Disabled Individuals

By: Jenny Wise

Changes in the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 have improved job prospects for disabled persons in recent years. Amendments to Section 503 of the seminal labor legislation are aimed at helping U.S. companies expand staffs to include more disabled persons. As a result, qualified disabled individuals are receiving consideration for a number of roles that employment experts and forecasters have designated them as ideal for. Businesses are increasingly willing to consider and hire disabled individuals or provide internships that give them valuable work experience.

Recent employment trends have given the disabled new opportunities to show what they can do in the workplace - a low unemployment rate is making it difficult for companies to find and retain workers, and many are restructuring jobs and finding positions that play to the strengths of the disabled individuals they hire. Here are some tips for landing increasingly promising roles for disabled persons:

Job seeking

Monitor in-demand opportunities and match them up with your experience, skills and education. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, computer programming, financial planning and lawyers are among the job opportunities with the highest potential. Get the word out and let everyone know you’re seeking a particular job through Facebook and other social media outlets; attend job-networking events and spread the word to friends and former co-workers. Remember that job hunting is about making connections and effective interpersonal communication, so reach out to hiring managers you identify by searching online job boards.

Take the time to get your resume just right. It’s your calling card and your best means of self-promotion. Keep it brief and to the point with information about your background that speaks directly to the job which you are seeking. If you’re fortunate enough to secure an interview, research the company so you can prepare thoughtful questions for the interviewer, practice answering difficult interview questions and be engaging and enthusiastic about the opportunity.

Entrepreneurship

If you have a concept for starting your own business, learn everything you can about the market niche, customer base and the competition. Check out the funding aspect of it, determining whether you’ll require an external source of funding to get things going. Learn about new business funding options such as a business line of credit, Small Business Association loan or term loan.

Accountant

Financial institutions have some of the highest employment rates for disabled individuals, with a projected growth rate of nearly 11 percent in this sector of the workforce. With a median salary of more than $67,000, accounting is growing role for people with disabilities.

Financial managers

Financial management is also a promising field. Vocational experts observe that disabled financial professionals have an excellent insight into how companies can adapt products and services to create a healthier financial picture and how they can adapt their services to better serve the needs of the disabled community.

Management consultant

Disabled individuals possess considerable insight into the hurdles faced by other disabled people who seek employment opportunities. That perspective makes disabled candidates well-suited to the demands of management consultancy, an employment niche with strong growth potential for disabled job seekers.

Competition for positions can be fierce these days, with low unemployment rates and an increase in the hiring of disabled individuals by U.S. companies. Be diligent about identifying high-potential positions that fit your capabilities and prepare to make a strong impression with a well-written resume and an effective and well-conceived interview strategy.

 

Courtesy of Pixabay.com.

214 Interactive